Beyond Food: A Sustainable Landscape

Tuesday, 31 March 2009 09:30

By Dan Segal

As more people choose clean, healthy, local food, it’s clear most of us have more than one reason for our choices. We may want to support farming methods we see as cleaner, safer and healthier for all creatures—an endorsement. We may want to keep more of our money in the local economy. For some it’s about community, the vibrant, essential bonds that good food nurtures. Of course all these reasons make sense, and at some level, they’re factors for just about all of us. Most people don’t realize, however, that the same factors can, and should, steer their decisions about landscape plants, even those that aren’t edible.

In general, landscapes are often considered “green,” regardless of the history of the plant material. The nursery and landscape trades often call themselves “The Green Industry,” but once you see behind the curtain — how plants are branded, mass-marketed and mass-produced in the world of big, commercial horticulture — you’ll feel the same way about your landscape plants as you do about your food — that the plants themselves embody the integrity of the process — and you’ll prefer the cleaner stuff. Since the current big horticulture model for selling nursery plants keeps you in the dark about methods and history, I feel someone needs to spur progress by taking the first step: giving an insider’s view of how most plants are produced, and what happens to them before they reach your garden. As a nurseryman I’ve been growing plants for almost 20 years, and I’ve always worked outside the mainstream — by choice, largely because of what I know about how things are done “on the inside.

Read more: Beyond Food: A Sustainable Landscape


Keeping the Green in GreenStar

Tuesday, 31 March 2009 09:28

By Kristie Snyder,
GreenLeaf Editor

In April, “going green” is on all of our minds as we prepare to celebrate the 39th annual Earth Day, mindful of the urgent threats of climate change and the challenges we face in creating a sustainable society. Being “green” is a central part of what GreenStar is all about — it’s right there in our name —  and we’ve long used the color green to express who we are, a tradition continued with our new logo.

Part of GreenStar’s mission statement is “exercising ecological responsibility and leadership.” In September 2003, Council passed its Ecological Responsibility and Leadership Policy, charging the General Manager with ensuring that “the store’s activities and practices, including its product line, minimize negative impacts and maximize positive impacts on the environment and that GreenStar takes a leadership role in exercising ecological responsibility.”

Read more: Keeping the Green in GreenStar

GM Supports Patronage Refund System

Friday, 31 October 2008 11:09


By Bini Reilly,
General Manager

Upon arriving at GreenStar, I learned that a patronage refund system was soon to be voted on by the membership. I believe member-owners should vote in support of this bylaws change. Membership in GreenStar means you are a member-owner in this community-based enterprise. As such, you should want to ensure the continued and future viability of the Co-op.  It is the right thing, as a member-owner, not to take monies out of the Co-op until you know that the Co-op is financially stable.

Every month, GreenLeaf prints the seven Cooperative Principles, to which GreenStar subscribes (see page 4). The principle that describes how a cooperative compensates member-owners is Principle 3: Member Economic Participation, as defined by the International Co-operative Alliance:

Read more: GM Supports Patronage Refund System


Page 22 of 25

  • 04.10.15

    By Dan Hoffman,
Council Member

    2013 Dan Hoffman12th Moon, Kristen Kaplan, Eric Banford, Susan Beckley, Jessica Rossi and Mark Darling finished the counting in just under four hours.

    412 Total valid envelopes

    21 total invalid = 19- no ID, 1- first of two ballots, 1- no ballot in envelope

    Also = 1- name tag, 5- 2 cent slips, 1- Member Labor Request and two wooden nickles.

    Two thirds vote required to pass.

    Q#1 = PASS

    361 YES,

    12 NO

    Q#2 = FAIL

    222 YES,

    147 NO

    Q#3 = PASS

    311 YES,

    61 NO

    Q#4 = PASS

    331 YES,

    22 NO

    Q#5 = PASS

    340 YES,

    30 NO

    Q#6 = PASS

    366 YES,

    7 NO

    GreenStar member-owners are the only ones who have the power to change the Co-op's bylaws, the organization's most basic and important document. There is an opportunity to do so (or not) during this month — at the Fall Member Meeting, at the stores, or by mail.

    GreenStar's Council has established an ad hoc Bylaws Review Committee, which started meeting again earlier this year, after being inactive for at least two years. Council had referred a couple of issues to the committee, which identified several more on its own. In August, Council voted (unanimously, except in the case of #2, below) to send the committee's six recommended bylaws amendments to the membership for a YES or NO vote on each of the following questions:

    1. Should the Co-op be allowed to use a withdrawing member's refundable equity contribution [which could be up to $90] to pay off any outstanding debt the member has to the Co-op (such as for bad checks)?

    2. Should all Council candidates and members be required to satisfy any requirements associated with operational licenses maintained or sought by the Co-op (such as to sell or serve alcohol)?

    3. Should Council be allowed to conduct closed executive sessions for two additional topics — possible litigation or contract negotiations?

    4. Should the composition of Council's Immediacies Committee be changed to match that described in Council policy, and that of the Executive Planning Committee?

    5. Should the use of gender-specific pronouns (such as "he" or "she") be eliminated in the bylaws?

    6. Should three "clerical errors" made when the bylaws were amended in 2010 be officially corrected?

    Much more information on the proposed amendments, including detailed explanations, pro and con statements and voting instructions, are available in the Fall Member Mailing, which all current members should receive in the mail by October 6. Members can vote up until close of business on Oct. 31 at either store, by mailing in the ballot from the Mailing, or in person at the Fall Member Meeting, on Friday, Oct. 16, at the Space.



Current Job Postings

  • By Alexis Alexander,
Membership Manager

    I have woken to a new day, a day when GreenStar's annual Member Meetings and pancakes are defined as pure elegance and inspiration. Surprised?

    The morning after our Fall Member Meeting, I'm entranced by the experience of last night. I realize how far GreenStar has come over the years, and how integral and essential a partner we are in the wider regional food movement before us. Our roots as a buying club and grain store have matured into a multimillion-dollar community-ba...



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