Health

Kundalini Yoga: Truth Is Who We Are

By Sareanda Lourdes

bigstock-Woman-practicing-yoga-at-sunri-smAs I rose out of bed this morning and began to breathe, stretch, and sing with the rising sun, I felt a wild and far-reaching gratitude. I felt my mother, all my teachers, and the Hindu and Sikh sages from whom yoga understanding was born, bathing me in their love. It's because of their grace I get to practice and share this with you, this path of healing, truth, service, devotion.

Kundalini energy is the wild-divine-feminine, first-force-of-all-creation, creative-mother snake goddess curled sleeping at the base of the spine. Kundalini literally means "curl of the lock of the beloved." Growing the hair long and coiling it on the head is an ancient and effective way of awakening and raising this creative feminine force.

The kundalini unfurls upward from our root as we breathe, stretch, and sing ourselves open to her. As she flows through our core, like sap rising through a maple tree, every tissue is vitally energized and restored. Limitations of the mind and painful patterns slough away; new growth is nourished, and our creativity flourishes. We are free to bloom, bear fruit, and rain blessings.

These blessings happen within and all around us. Kundalini yoga strengthens the body, restores the nervous system, helps balance hormones, sets free the uniqueness within, and develops intuition. And as the kundalini energy touches the crown of the head, it opens a thousand-petaled lotus, which releases the sweet waters of Amrita, nectar of the infinite. This nectar gives us direct experience of oneness, bliss, truth, immortality.

Read more: Kundalini Yoga: Truth Is Who We Are

Building a Meal with Four Basic Vegan Food Groups

By Lewis Freedman, RD

Lewisserving-smMy simple plan for dinner is this:

Start with a grain, add a bean, a veggie that's orange, and one that is green.

I have followed this simple system for years. To make an easy, yet complete, balanced, and nurturing meal, I think of these four food groups.

I generally start by looking in the refrigerator. What grains and/or beans do I have already cooked? If I have a cooked grain, I know I can freshen it up with steaming. If I have a bean, I can make a soup, or simply heat it up with some seasoning in a skillet. If not, there are many stored grains and beans I can use.

Then I look to an orange food. Winter squash, sweet potatoes, and carrots are most often at hand.

Finally, I complement the meal with a green — kale, collards, broccoli, snow peas, spinach, and lettuce, to name a few. Some might be in the refrigerator, some in the garden.

Let's look at each of the four food groups more closely.

Read more: Building a Meal with Four Basic Vegan Food Groups

 

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