Health

The Health Benefits of Ballet

By Deanna Berman, ND, CM

Ballet is a wonderful form of exercise and an opportunity to develop many skills necessary in life. For some, it may also be a part of the road back to health, both psychological and physical. These benefits may be obtained through the study of ballet whether taking a Saturday morning class for fun or training for a performance. The emotional and physical benefits that occur through the study of ballet can be utilized in many areas of one’s life. Here are some of the benefits of ballet.

Read more: The Health Benefits of Ballet

A Personal Experience with Hospice Care

By Becca Harber

I spent two months with my mom in Colorado before she died from advanced cancer at the end of last year. I’d never been a daily caregiver, never witnessed, day by day, anyone dying, never been with someone at the moment of death or ever had anything serious about which to negotiate with my sister and brother. I learned a lot, including in retrospect, as a caregiver who had no mentors or personal guidance about taking care of myself in relation to my mom or our relationship in the limited time that existed. I’m deeply grateful that Mom, at 84 and with tumors in 80 percent of her liver, chose to live what was left of life without medical cancer treatment, life support or hospital time, instead, signing into the local hospice’s services, which offered enormous support at home and a final six days in Boulder/Lafayette’s Hospice Care center. 

Mom only learned she had cancer at September’s end, and by December’s, she was dead. She only felt sick for 35 days. I arrived in early November, when she didn’t feel or look sick, to stay with and support her. We attended an “End of Life Advanced Directives” workshop at Hospice Care that first weekend. This was crucial regarding what happened later. We learned about medical life supports that most terminally ill people receive and their actual impacts. Did you know that of everyone, frail, robust, young or old, that receives in-hospital CPR, only 15.2 percent survive, including people who are left brain dead or damaged? If frail, with multiple health problems or terminally ill, only 2 percent survive. As the presenting nurse said, “Usually you’re in the ER, spread-eagled, naked, with about 15 people nearby while you receive convulsive electric shocks. I’m not going to go like that.” Neither was my mom. The nurse also explained that when someone is dying, they typically lose appetite, then lose interest in food, and eventually water, because the body is shutting down. IVs for feeding/water tend to make dying people bloat and feel more uncomfortable, because they can’t process those substances any more, sometimes bringing death sooner. 

Read more: A Personal Experience with Hospice Care

 

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    By Zuri Sabir

    120511-bill-out-of-ithaca1Bill held some of his beliefs very deeply, and one of those was simply that people should mind their own business. And as a staunch individualist, Bill's definition of one's own business was fairly narrow. I am not as strong an individualist as Bill, however, believing, for example, that every person's well-being is to some extent the ...

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