Health

Eating Tips for a Safer and More Active Summer

By Aaron Lambert

When you’re out biking, hiking, gardening or doing other outdoor activities, wouldn’t you like to feel your best? Wouldn’t it be nice to be full of vitality day after day, no matter how much energy you expend during the summer months? Wouldn’t it be great to have a dynamic body that is  more resistant to fatigue, cramping and dehydration? Is it even possible to reach these goals, especially if you are currently not in the best shape of your life?

 It is definitely possible for you, your kids, family members and anyone else you know to create and maintain a body that has the “get up and go” to allow full enjoyment of summer activities. The catch, though, is that you will have to work at it. The goal is to develop eating habits that provide your body with nutrient-dense foods that furnish the genuine replacement parts, in the form of minerals, nutrients and vitamins, needed for the body to achieve and maintain excellent health. Below are some of the habits and foods that we recommend specifically for those who plan on being active outdoors.

Read more: Eating Tips for a Safer and More Active Summer

Alternatives to the Holiday Sugar Rush

By Aaron Lambert

We’ve all heard it.  We are all aware of it to one degree or another.  Even so, let’s just hear it one more time: We Americans eat too much sugar.  Old, young, male or female, it doesn’t matter.  Sugar is present everywhere in the diets of most people.  Go ahead and read the ingredients of the packaged goods in your house.  It might be listed under the name high fructose corn syrup (HFCS), evaporated cane juice or fruit juice, but it’s still sugar. Sugar is added in one form or another to breads, cereals, soda, canned goods, baked goods, pre-made meals, processed meat, ketchup and sports drinks.  Even if you drink natural fruit juice, you’re drinking pure fructose (a sugar).

The estimates of sugar consumption range from 170 to 220 pounds per person per year.  That is an enormous amount, considering that adults should have only about two teaspoons of sugar in their blood at any one time.  We have all heard the reports about the epidemics of diabetes and obesity.  Children as young as eight years old are now being diagnosed with diabetes type II.  Diabetes II is a dangerous chronic illness that generally results from the over-consumption of sugar.  In effect, the pancreas burns out and the body can no longer produce enough insulin, which is needed to get sugar into your cells.  Obesity, too, is a growing problem.  The consumption of so much sugar provides the body with more calories than it needs, and so it stores the excess as fat.  Both obesity and diabetes II increase the probability of incurring additional chronic health problems such as cardiovascular disease.

Read more: Alternatives to the Holiday Sugar Rush

 

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    By Becca Harber

    bigstock Water_Pollution_300There's enough water for human need, but not enough for human greed.

    — Ghandi

    From California to New York to distant lands, people are taking the extremely destructive effects of bottled water increasingly seriously. New York City has banned bottled water sales in its government workplaces, and San Francisco, Albuqu...

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