produce

Kid Stuff

By Joe Romano, 

Marketing Manager

brussel-sproutsIt's bizarre that the produce manager is more important to my children's health than the pediatrician.

— Meryl Streep

For centuries adults have been telling kids to eat healthier foods.

Maybe we should be showing them healthy food, instead. Researchers from Iowa State University conducted a study at a summer camp for children ages 6-12 with diabetes. They used a bright, colorful, rotating digital display that featured an image of a salad. The researchers found that the kid's salad consumption increased by as much as 90 percent!

They were offered all the usual fare, like tacos, sloppy joes, fruits and vegetables; the option of a salad bar was simply added to the menu, along with the attractive signage.

"The cool effect that we found and didn't expect was with boys," said Laura Smarandescu, an assistant professor of marketing at Iowa State. "It makes sense because boys like video games and interact more with technology. We noticed many boys stopping to look at the display and their behavior seemed to be more influenced by the presence of the display."

Read more: Kid Stuff

 

Local's Looking Good in the Produce Dept.

By Kristie Snyder, 

GreenLeaf Editor

Andrew Hernandez_smAndrew Hernandez II, GreenStar's Produce Manager, lives downtown with two cats that he loves — and a five-year-old frog. A Florida tree frog, to be more specific, one that hitched a ride from the Sunshine State up to New York City in a bunch of Lady Moon Farms organic red kale. He was discovered by Andrew, who adopted the stowaway.

Andrew came to the Produce Manager job from Integral Yoga Natural Foods in Manhattan, where he held the same position for eight years, and where he met his amphibious pet. The tiny, busy store does about a quarter of GreenStar's annual business in a much smaller fraction of the space, which is why "the 10 on the 10th sales days don't really faze me," he laughs. If he looks somewhat familiar to some of you long-time shoppers, it's because he worked in the GreenStar Deli kitchen for a few years before moving to NYC.

He came to Ithaca way back then from Greenfield, Massachusetts, with a childhood friend — "just to get out of my small town into a slightly less-small small town," he explains — but musical aspirations soon took him to Brooklyn. "I'd done as much as I could in Ithaca and needed to see what else I could do," he explained. The move paid off, as membership in a series of bands led him to the drummer's spot in Tombs, a critically acclaimed psychedelic black metal band signed on Relapse Records. Andrew now travels to Brooklyn a few days a month to practice with his Tombs bandmates, and he's also a member of the Brooklyn/Ithaca-based metal band Twin Lords and Centopeia, a local "metallic angular noise rock" project.

Read more: Local's Looking Good in the Produce Dept.

Remembrance Farm: Growing Food Holistically

By Kristie Snyder, 

GreenLeaf Editor

remembrance-emilyAn early May visit to Remembrance Farm was a reminder of just how abundant the Finger Lakes region can be — already, an absurd amount of fresh greens were nearly ready for harvest. Rows upon rows of tiny onion seedlings had just sprouted out of the soil, and empty rows awaiting planting stretched into the distance. Then we visited the chickens. As we stepped over the fence into their field, a river of golden-brown hens surrounded us, hoping we had brought them something good to eat.

Nathaniel and Emily Thompson have been running Remembrance Farm for ten years, seven in its current location near Trumansburg, and three years prior to that in Danby. The current farm is made up of both owned and leased land, which totals about 100 tillable acres.

Like many farms in the area, Remembrance's products are certified organic, but the farm is unique in being the only certified biodynamic farm in the area. Based on principles established by Austrian philosopher Rudolph Steiner (also the father of Waldorf education), biodynamic farming regards growing food as a holistic venture, and its products are designed to support both physical and spiritual health. As Nathaniel explains it, the three core principles of biodynamic farming are a vision of the farm as an organism, the use of biodynamic preparations, and the intention of the farmer regarding the farm.

Read more: Remembrance Farm: Growing Food Holistically

 

Page 1 of 4

«StartPrev1234NextEnd»

New in Produce

¡Viva la [Local] Revolución!

Andrew Hernandez,
Produce Manager

remembrance-greensCelebrate local history by supporting local farms — July brings greens, herbs, cukes, cabbage, and berries.

In July 1848, just a 53-minute drive from Ithaca, the first-ever women's rights convention was held in Seneca Falls, NY. Topics discussed included voting rights, property rights, and divorce. This gathering marked the beginning of the women's rights movement in the United States. History in our veritable backyard.

So, you want local produce? We've got local produce! Stick and Stone Farm brings us kale and basil, Blue Heron Farm provides us with zucchini, summer squash, cukes, and cabbage, and Remembrance Farm offers their full slate of baby salad greens: Flower Power, Field Greens, Spicy Greens, Arugula, Tatsoi, and Baby Kale, all available in 5-oz. clamshell packages. Also keep your eyes peeled for local fruit as berries start to ripen and become available. Have a safe and fun 4th of July and remember: "¡Viva la revolución!"

facebook logo pinterest badge_red Twitter-badge1

co-op-deals

blog-button