'Get Foodie' Debuts with Co-op Sponsorship

By Kristie Snyder,
GreenLeaf Editor

veg-318pxCarisa Fallon has wanted to do a cooking show since her daughter Rebecca, now nine, was a baby. “I’ve always loved to cook, and my mom did organic gardening so I had exposure to healthy choices,” she said.

Read more: 'Get Foodie' Debuts with Co-op Sponsorship

 

'The Good Life' Is Sustainable, and Sweet, Too

By Kristie Snyder, 

GreenLeaf Editor

good_life_farm_mm_spinachIt’s not easy growing fresh vegetables through the depths of a Finger Lakes winter. But Melissa Madden and Garrett Miller of the Good Life Farm in Interlaken have been supplying GreenStar with fresh greens since November, as they work toward building their young farm into a long-term, sustainable, permaculture enterprise.

Perched on a hillside overlooking Cayuga Lake, and largely powered by horse, human and dog, the 69-acre farm was named in homage to both Helen and Scott Nearing (the homesteading pioneers whose famous 1954 book about their “Forest Farm” is titled Living the Good Life) and to Mark Shepard, who mentored Madden and Miller on his “New Forest Farm” in Wisconsin. And, says Madden, “the good life is what we want to provide!”

Read more: 'The Good Life' Is Sustainable, and Sweet, Too

Heirloom Veggies Preserve Heritage

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By Patrick Sewell

Ithaca is Gardens, or so it could be argued. A low-impact, inexpensive, hands-in-the-dirt activity, many Ithacans have used gardening to reconnect with the earth and discover the miracle of food. Gardens have even become political symbols, demonstrating resistance to an agricultural system heavily reliant on oil, pesticides and food monopolization. Of course, home gardens were even more prevalent before the arrival of industrial farming and the readily available, inexpensive calorie. At that time, growing crops was a necessity that supplemented people’s nutritional and medicinal needs. So important was the garden in fact, that seeds were often saved from generation to generation and handed down along with other prized familial goods. These seeds, formally known as heirlooms, are stores of information, carrying with them the genetic heritage of the environment in which they were formed and the stories of an earlier time and place.

 

Today, many of those who garden feel a certain draw to replant these heirloom varieties in their own yards. For one thing, heirloom plants often have a story associated with them, usually related to their origin. The Trail of Tears Bean, for example, is a pole bean that was carried by the Cherokees on their forced march westward, when displaced by white settlers in the 1800s. The Cherokee Purple tomato, presented to the gardening world by a Mr. Green from Tennessee, is one of the very first known black tomato cultivars, which was said to be given by the Cherokee Indians to his neighbor “100 years ago.”

Read more: Heirloom Veggies Preserve Heritage

 

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New in Produce

Local Bounty Bounding In

Andrew Hernandez,
Produce Manager

BlueberriesThe local bounty keeps on keepin' on — August brings green beans, kale, tomatoes (yes!), and blueberries.

August — the swan song of a full summer month calls as the autumnal session edges closer with the coming of September; we move away from the hot-air humidity of July; and are promised the chance of more comfort, but at the cost of recessing daylight and falling degrees. Beyond lamentations of climate woes, we can smile in cheer as local produce continues to rear its beautiful head. This month, Stick and Stone Farm provides us with organic green beans, kale, and various tomatoes as their season is finally upon us, and Hillberry (transitional organic) and Rose Valley Farm (certified organic) continue to supply us with their delicious blueberries, fresh-picked and ready for your pies or smoothies, or just eating out of the container. And we still have an abundance of produce from local favorites: Remembrance Farm, Blue Heron Farm, and Dancing Turtle Sprouts.

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