Get a Jump on Spring: Grow Your Own Seedlings

By Stephanie Van Parys

Summer is only four months away, so it’s not too early to think of your summer garden. After making a list of what veggies you want to grow next summer, the next step is to figure out what you can start early by growing seedlings. Let me give you a few reasons why it’s worth the effort to grow your own vegetable starts:

You control the varieties and quality of the transplants going into your garden based on your own selections, not what the local garden center has available;

  • You control the timing of when you want to plant your garden;
  • More plants for less money;
  • Preservation of heirloom and rare varieties;
  • Fun!

Read more: Get a Jump on Spring: Grow Your Own Seedlings

 

Root Vegetable Renaissance

By Robin Ostfeld,
Blue Heron Farm

Seasonal changes affect us more than we think. As the days get shorter, leaves fall to the ground, squirrels gather their winter caches of food, and humans feel the urge to fatten up and put food away for the winter. It’s a lot like getting a supply of firewood to ward off the cold and snow. There’s a unique satisfaction in preparing for winter.

In November, other farms are wrapping up the season, while we at Blue Heron are running at full tilt. My phone rings off the hook and my email in-box fills up with inquiries about our winter produce subscription. It’s cold and muddy as we sprint toward the finish line, which for us is frozen ground and temps in the 20s. Our crop availability list is longer than ever. When we’re not picking hardy greens, such as collards, kale, spinach and arugula we’re cutting broccoli, cabbage, Brussels sprouts and cauliflower. Leeks are shoveled up and trimmed. And then there are the root vegetables, from beets and carrots to rutabagas and turnips. Days on end are spent pulling and topping vegetables, and filling the walk-in coolers.

Read more: Root Vegetable Renaissance

Local Heroes: West Haven Farm Apples

By Felix Teitelbaum,GreenLeaf Editor
You may have sometimes wondered at the selection of organic apples at GreenStar and why so many of them come from so far away. The fact is, in 2001, of the 12,189 acres of certified organic apples grown in this country, fully 95% were grown west of the Rockies. Although NY is well known for its delicious apples, organic growers in NY, and all over the Northeast, face many more challenges than their western counterparts.

Read more: Local Heroes: West Haven Farm Apples

 

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New in Produce

Ready, Get Set, Start Your Seeds!

Andrew Hernandez,
Produce Manager

seedlingsIf you can hunker down through the last of winter —gardening season is coming. Look for organic, local seeds and more.

It's a tough month for local produce, folks, I ain't going to tell you no lie. Blue Heron Farm still has parsnips and potatoes. Stick and Stone is not sure how the carrot supply will hold up, but they still have their root medley. But IT is right around the corner. If you're like me, you're probably still thawing like Han Solo from your carbonite prison, slowly warming and blinking at the light — what is this thing? I believe IT is called THE SUN! Daylight saving time begins March 11, and March 20 ushers in the first day of SPRING! A slow return of green, flowers, and our wonderful abundance of fresh local produce are coming. Soon we will all be biking, swimming, and running around. In the meantime we have lots of potting soil and growing mix, and plenty of seeds. Be sure to check out our awesome variety of organic Fruition seeds, some of which are grown right around the corner at Remembrance Farm in Trumansburg.

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