GreenStar Toasts Finger Lakes
 Cider Week

By Tina Wright

14 9 Belleweather bottlesNew craft hard ciders are jumping into the market almost monthly, according to GreenStar's Grocery Manager Adam Morris. He says, "Cider sales are on the rise as more and more people recognize the great taste, the fact that cider is naturally gluten-free, and their desire to support the local food web." Craft ciders are starting to give craft beers a run for their money. GreenStar sold $17,721's worth of hard cider in 2013.

A longtime supplier to our store, Bellwether Hard Cider in Trumansburg has been a lonely outpost of hard cidery on the fringe of Finger Lakes wine country for years, but now they have enough local competition to easily help float the third annual Finger Lakes Craft Cider Week, October 3-12.

The local cider week includes one of the newer cider makers to be carried by GreenStar, Harvest Moon Cidery from Cazenovia. Adam says, "I'm personally very happy to see local apple farmers finding a niche for value-added products in the form of hard ciders. Each local or regional cider we carry represents another strand in the local food web, and I'm proud that our co-op helps get these ciders to customers in the Finger Lakes."

Read more: GreenStar Toasts Finger Lakes
 Cider Week

 

Hillberry: A Family Blueberry Farm Is Born

By Kristie Snyder,

GreenLeaf Editor

hillberry-smFor Pat Hickey and Karin Dahlander of Hillberry, farming is a family affair. The couple owns a young blueberry farm perched on a beautiful hillside in Berkshire, running it with the help of their parents, children, and friends. This year, for the first time, they are marketing their fresh blueberries in GreenStar's Produce Department.

Neither Pat nor Karin has a farming background (they are both former GreenStar employees — Pat still works a sub shift now and then). But as owners of prime farmland in Berkshire, they knew they wanted to put the land into production. They settled on perennial crops, and a consultation with Cornell Cooperative Extension and soil maps of the area pointed to blueberries as a crop likely to succeed. The idea "felt right," according to Pat — they liked the idea of farming a crop that is less subject to pest and disease pressure than other fruits, and thus well-suited to organic practices. They researched blueberry culture for two years while cover cropping the ground that would receive the plants, and Hillberry was born. (Their ten-year-old daughter Willa contributed the name. "We have berries on a hill!" she said.)

Pat and Karin's four children, Willa, Emmitt, August, and Winter, form an integral part of the farm. Willa and Emmitt help with picking and looking after their younger brothers. ("We have the cutest blueberry pickers," Pat's mother, Carol, pointed out.) On a recent visit to the farm, Willa noticed a plant with some discolored leaves and pointed it out to her father, who suggested it might indicate some sort of mineral deficiency in the soil. "This field is for the kids," Karin said. "It's something to come back to and be able to make an honest living at."

Read more: Hillberry: A Family Blueberry Farm Is Born

Stone fruit recall!

stone-fruit-recallGreenStar has pulled all stonefruit related to the packaging company associated with a possible listeria contamination. We only had a few cases of nectarines from "Sweet 2 Eat". If you have any fruit with a Sweet 2 Eat sticker, please return it to our store for a full refund.

 

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New in Produce

Local Bounty Bounding In

Andrew Hernandez,
Produce Manager

BlueberriesThe local bounty keeps on keepin' on — August brings green beans, kale, tomatoes (yes!), and blueberries.

August — the swan song of a full summer month calls as the autumnal session edges closer with the coming of September; we move away from the hot-air humidity of July; and are promised the chance of more comfort, but at the cost of recessing daylight and falling degrees. Beyond lamentations of climate woes, we can smile in cheer as local produce continues to rear its beautiful head. This month, Stick and Stone Farm provides us with organic green beans, kale, and various tomatoes as their season is finally upon us, and Hillberry (transitional organic) and Rose Valley Farm (certified organic) continue to supply us with their delicious blueberries, fresh-picked and ready for your pies or smoothies, or just eating out of the container. And we still have an abundance of produce from local favorites: Remembrance Farm, Blue Heron Farm, and Dancing Turtle Sprouts.

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