'To the Future, McFly'

 Time flies like an 
arrow. Fruit flies like a banana.

— Groucho Marx

By Joe Romano, 

Marketing Manager

S.H Horikawa  Star Strider RobotFor years now we have seen futuristic kitchens of all description — "smart kitchens," with appliances that can be controlled with our phones, hidden kitchens that disappear like a Murphy bed, minimalist kitchens, outdoor kitchens, automated kitchens, and even kitchens made of recycled paper.

These are modern cookzones equipped with computers, lasers, glass cooktops, induction plates, invisible burners, automated stirrers, turbo ovens, vaporizers, heating spoons, flash freezers, extruders, ozonizers, ultraviolet ray lamps, electrolyzers, colloidal mills, autoclaves, dialyzers, stills, and of course, half of them will talk to you.

Traditional housewares have been replaced with digital readout measuring cups, rollup toasters, musical salt shakers, and milk jugs that can call you to tell you that the milk has gone bad.

The Qumi, a cooking device shaped like a crystal ball, can be used for heating, frying, and steaming and can only be controlled through your mobile device. I'd keep my eye on that one.

Read more: 'To the Future, McFly'

 

Dancing Turtle Sprouts a 
Green Business

By Kristie Snyder,
GreenLeaf Editor

13-3 Ellen-smEllen Brown is a farmer with no farmland. She grows her crops in the downstairs kitchen and backyard of her split-level house on Snyder Hill Road.

Ellen is a sprout farmer. Her crops are small — sometimes tiny — but they pack a nutritional punch. Sprouting is simply the process of germinating seeds, and then maybe letting them grow a little bit. "Sprouting makes more nutrition available," Ellen explains. "Nutrients become more absorbable, and the taste of sprouts is great." According to Ellen, sprouts are high in vitamins, minerals, amino acids, and phytochemicals.

Her "sprout kitchen" is a light-filled room in the downstairs of the home she shares with her partner, Mat, and 10-month-old son, Jacob. Jars of sprouts line one wall and flats of sprouts line another. In between are a table for packing and a spot for Jacob to play while his mom tends to the sprouts. When the weather warms a bit, the sprouts will move to a backyard hoophouse, or even just outdoors, but when we visited in March it was frigid outside, and the little plants were snug in their kitchen.

Ellen began growing sprouts about four years ago after trying out market gardening and deciding she preferred the mobility of sprouts. "It's a moveable garden," she says. "You don't need to own a large piece of farmland to be a part of the local food community."

Read more: Dancing Turtle Sprouts a 
Green Business

New Tomato Fights Blight - High Mowing Organic Seeds Releases "Iron Lady"

By Tina Wright

iron-lady-sm
A bowl of ripe Iron Lady tomatoes. Photo: High Mowing Organic Seeds

For vegetable growers and fans of tomatoes, 2009 was the Year of No Tomatoes as the fungal disease late blight decimated the region's crop and spurred a race for a cure. Gardeners, farmer's markets, and CSAs were all bereft of the red fruit that practically defines summer. If they ever make a movie about "the fight against blight," it should be filmed right here in Ithaca. A Cornell tomato breeder would be one of the stars, and it could be filmed on location at the Cornell Organic Research Farm in Freeville, in its test plots of tomato plants.

Every spring, GreenStar sells seeds from High Mowing Organic Seeds, a certified-organic company in Vermont that's releasing the first truly blight-resistant tomato, Iron Lady, in 2013. Iron Lady tomato seeds may be tough to score this year if demand outstrips supply (there are none on GreenStar's High Mowing seed display rack at present), but in the pipeline are more tomato varieties that offer the same triple-resistance to early blight, late blight, and Septoria leaf spot.

Robin Ostfeld is a partner at Blue Heron Farm in Lodi, which supplies GreenStar with local organic tomatoes and tomato seedlings. This growing season, Ostfeld says, "I'm planning to trial Iron Lady and a new late-blight-etcetera-resistant cherry tomato from Johnny's Selected Seeds called Jasper. I'll be selling plants as well as seeing how they perform on the farm for production."

Read more: New Tomato Fights Blight - High Mowing Organic Seeds Releases "Iron Lady"

 

Page 3 of 9

«StartPrev123456789NextEnd»

New in Produce

Local Produce Rolls Deep This Month

Andrew Hernandez,
Produce Manager

If you're looking to keep your veggie drawer filled with local bounty, this is your month. Fruit, veggies, herbs — it's all here.

thornbush-grapes-smSeptember brings the anniversary of Brazil's declaration of independence after centuries of Portuguese rule, the birthdays of legendary boxer "Rocky" Marciano, writer Truman Capote, and American revolutionary Samuel Adams ("I'll have a Samuel Jackson"), and the autumnal equinox. Summer's over ... how short it was. While I will lament the end of summer until it returns again, we can at the very least look forward to the rich and vibrant local harvest that continues on through this most comfortable of months. Stick and Stone Farm brings us delicious heirlooms tomatoes, green beans, and three kales: Red Russian, dino, and curly. We've got local apples — Sansa, Cox Orange Pippin, Pink Pearl, and more; and plums ­— Castelton, Long John, Fortune — from Black Diamond Farm; plus more veggies from Blue Heron Farm — broccoli, celery, cilantro, garlic, red potatoes, and tomatoes. Here comes fall, "que sera sera."

facebook logo pinterest badge_red Twitter-badge1

co-op-deals

blog-button