Grow Happy

By Robin Ostfeld,
Blue Heron Farm

Everyone who has the opportunity should grow some of his or her own food. Even if it’s just a container with herbs or a single tomato plant, it’s worthwhile to grow something. Of course, I’m biased. Plants play a huge role in my own life, being both my livelihood and my hobby.  But there are so many reasons to get your hand dirty!

One morning last summer, a friend brought a copy of the magazine Discover to the farm. In it was an article that linked contact with soil bacteria to the release of serotonin in the brain.  In other words, inhaling or touching the soil bacteria (called mycobacterium vaccae) can cause a peaceful state of mind or, in a depressed person, an alleviation of the symptoms of depression. Wow! A new reason to garden! Not only is it good for the environment (there’s no food more local than that which you pick from your own backyard) and personal health (from the standpoint of the exercise involved and the fact that fresh picked produce has the highest amount of nutrients), but now it’s been shown to promote mental health as well! Of course, I knew it all along.

Read more: Grow Happy


Bread and Roses

By Kristie Snyder,
Marketing Assistant

Hearts starve as well as bodies; give us bread, but give us roses!

—James Oppenheim, from a 1911 poem supporting a Lawrence, Massachusetts textile worker’s strike

The workers that James Oppenheim’s poem paid tribute to were mostly immigrant women, who fed their families mainly—and meagerly—on a diet of bread. They were striking, ultimately unsuccessfully, against a pay cut. Starving was a very real threat; presumably they were less worried about their hearts. But the “bread and roses” quote endures—a testament to the power that the beauty of flowers holds.

Today, it’s South American flower workers, most of whom are also women, who might well be seeking “bread and roses.” Amy Garbincus, a flower and vegetable farmer at Three Sisters Farm and GreenStar Wellness staffer, says she is often asked, “Who cares if flowers are organic?”

Read more: Bread and Roses

Get a Jump on Spring: Grow Your Own Seedlings

By Stephanie Van Parys

Summer is only four months away, so it’s not too early to think of your summer garden. After making a list of what veggies you want to grow next summer, the next step is to figure out what you can start early by growing seedlings. Let me give you a few reasons why it’s worth the effort to grow your own vegetable starts:

You control the varieties and quality of the transplants going into your garden based on your own selections, not what the local garden center has available;

  • You control the timing of when you want to plant your garden;
  • More plants for less money;
  • Preservation of heirloom and rare varieties;
  • Fun!

Read more: Get a Jump on Spring: Grow Your Own Seedlings


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New in Produce

Big Local Bounty

Andrew Hernandez,
Produce Manager

bigstock-Squash-smLocal produce is still rolling in. We've got greens and veggies of all kinds, and Black Diamond apples!

The receding of daylight, the descent of temperature, the cascading of leaves — the autumnal equinox is upon us as summer takes its final bow. Goodbye heat and humidity — it's time to break out the flannels like it's Seattle '91 and enjoy our local harvests while harvests we have. Stick and Stone Farm continues to provide unbeatable green beans, vibrant brassicas, delicious nightshades, and amazing Asian greens (baby bok choy, Chinese raab, and Chinese broccoli). Blue Heron Farm offers top-notch beets, cabbage, lettuce, and chard. Don't miss their fantastic garlic and tomatoes (can some salsa, you'll need a winter cupboard cache). Apple season is upon us as well. Black Diamond will provide us with 9+ different varieties of primo-quality apples and superbly delicious grapes. I mourn the passing of my summer sun, but remember how lucky we are to have the friendships of orchards and farms, farmers and farmhands, vegetables and fruits.

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